Imbas Pandemi Corona, Ini Foto Social Distancing di Dunia

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Imbas Pandemi Corona, Ini Foto Social Distancing di Dunia

Aisyah Kamaliah - detikInet
Kamis, 19 Mar 2020 16:50 WIB

Jakarta - Imbas dari pandemi virus corona menciptakan adanya gerakan social distancing. Tak hanya ramai di medsos, penerapannya benar-benar dilakukan di berbagai negara.

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Seorang pekerja mengukur jarak antrian di restoran Chef Jose Andres dalam respon pencegahan penularan COVId-19. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Jemaat menghadiri Misa Minggu di Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels pada 15 Maret 2020 di Los Angeles, California. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Supir Jeepney, Federico Tiozen Jr berinteraksi dengan seorang penumpang mengenakan sarung tangan untuk mencegah COVID-19. Foto ini diambil 16 Maret 2020 di Manila, Filipina. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Tak hanya memakai sarung tangan, ia juga memberi sekat untuk tempat duduk penumpangnya. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Orang-orang antre di Supermarket Lidl, Kota Barcelona, Spanyol. Supermarket telah menerapkan aturan sosial distancing yang lebih ketat ketika berkunjung ke toko mereka. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Social distancing juga dialami rekan media saat US Central Command Jenderal McKenzie menggelar pertemuan. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Gubernur Nevada, Steve Sisolak melakukan pertemuan dengan media dengan syarat jarak enam kaki atau hampir 2 meter untuk social distancing. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Tempat ini nampak kosong, padahal pusat perbelanjaan di Beijing, China ini sebelumnya selalu sibuk. Di Beijing, social distancing dilakukan secara luas sebagai aturan baru setelah dua bulan pembatasan untuk menghentikan penyebaran penyakit. Foto: Getty Images

BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 10: The empty courtyard of a usually busy shopping mall is seen on March10, 2020 in Beijing, China.  In Beijing, the normally bustling capital has fallen into a rhythm of social distancing that is widely accepted as the new norm after two months of restrictions to stop the disease from spreading. Millions of people are still working from home, schools and entertainment venues remain closed, and even commutes on some public transit need to be pre-booked to control crowds.  At the same time, China has been grappling with how to restart and revive the worlds second largest economy without triggering another wave of infections, especially in the home of the countrys political leadership.  So, while the cautious return of economic activity in Beijing has meant more road traffic and street life during the day, evening brings a return to the familiar quiet anxiety that has defined Chinas efforts to contain the virus.  After sunset, a majority of people avoid mingling or limit their interactions, and largely retreat to home. Retail stores follow reduced hours of operation, restaurants limit the number of people who can dine, and large gatherings are still banned. Residential areas have controls in place to restrict entry, and tighter quarantine rules require people returning to Beijing from other cities or countries to abide by a 14-day isolation period that is monitored and enforced.  Authorities are sensitive to so-called imported cases of the coronavirus with nearly 81,000 cases of COVID-19 in China and more than 3200 deaths, mostly in and around the city of Wuhan, in central Hubei province, where the outbreak first started. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
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